NBA Offseason: 2016 Free Agency Tracker
NBA Offseason: 2016 Free Agency Tracker

This article is part of our NBA Offseason series.

With the free agency moratorium period nearing its end, here's a look at all of the agreed-upon deals in place. Signings can become official as early as 12:01 a.m. eastern time Thursday morning.

This page will be updated to reflect forthcoming signings and any changes to expected deals.

Arron Afflalo
Old team: Knicks
New team: Kings
Contract: 2 years, $25 million
Why it makes sense: The Kings weren't going to attract any marquee free agents this summer, so Afflalo is about as close as it gets. They'll bring him in on a relatively affordable, short-term deal that expires as he'll enter his age-33 season. Afflalo may finally end what's been a revolving door at shooting guard, but he's far from a long-term solution.

Cole Aldrich
Old team: Clippers
New team: Timberwolves
Contract: 3 years, $22 million
Why it makes sense: Aldrich was shockingly competent as the backup to DeAndre Jordan last season, and he'll now bring insurance to a Wolves frontcourt that's likely to part ways with Nikola Pekovic, one way or another, at some point in the near future.

Ryan Anderson
Old team: Pelicans
New team: Rockets
Contract: 4 years, $80 million
Why it makes sense: Anderson was tailor-made to play in a Mike D'Antoni offense. Defensively, he leaves plenty to be desired, but he'll fill a need as a floor-spacing four who can shift down to the wing if D'Antoni opts to go big. The Rockets might give up 110 points per game, but there won't be many teams that will be able to match their ferocious offensive pace.

Darrell Arthur
Old team: Nuggets
New team: Nuggets
Contract: 3 years, $23 million
Why it makes sense: Arthur has proved his worth as a stretch forward off the bench, and he's coming off of a year in which he shot a career-best 38.5% from three.

D.J. Augustin
Old team: Nuggets
New team: Magic
Contract: 4 years, $29 million
Why it makes sense: Augustin has bounced around between five teams over the last three seasons, but he remains a competent backup point guard. His ability to shoot the three (37.4% career) will be a welcomed addition off the bench behind Elfrid Payton.

Leandro Barbosa
Old team: Warriors
New team: Suns
Contract: 2 years, $8 million
Why it makes sense: Barbosa enjoyed a nice career revival in Golden State, but the Warriors couldn't afford to keep him around after adding Kevin Durant. The veteran returns to Phoenix, where he spent the first seven years of his career and won the 2006-07 Sixth Man of the Year award.

Harrison Barnes
Old team: Warriors
New team: Mavericks
Contract: 4 years, $95 million
Why it makes sense: Barnes' struggles in the Finals overshadowed back-to-back productive and efficient seasons for the league's best team. Still, maxing out a player who's never been in a featured role, and expecting him to elevate his game, carries considerable risk. The Mavs are gambling that Barnes was not just a product of the Warriors' system.

Matt Barnes
Old team: Grizzlies
New team: Kings
Contract: 2 years, $12 million
Why it makes sense:Matt Barnes was born to play for this Kings team.

Nic Batum
Old team: Hornets
New team: Hornets
Contract: 5 years, $120 million
Why it makes sense: Coming off an injury-plagued 2014-15 campaign in Portland, Batum re-solidified himself as one of the league's premier two-way wings last season. The eight-year veteran is still only 27, so even if his play begins to decline over the final year or two of the deal, the Hornets didn't take much of a risk in inking him to a five-year contract. Charlotte will need to add a couple of pieces to truly become a contender in the East, but Batum is the type of veteran who makes everyone around him better.

Jerryd Bayless
Old team: Bucks
New team: 76ers
Contract: 3 years, $27 million
Why it makes sense: Bayless got the same deal as Henderson with an an extra year tacked on, tripling his per-year salary after he made just $3 million with the Bucks last season. Milwaukee may have been a better basketball situation, but Bayless should have plenty of opportunity in Philadelphia. He can play both guard spots, making him a strong fit next to Ben Simmons, who will spend considerable time both on and off the ball as a rookie.

Kent Bazemore
Old team: Hawks
New team: Hawks
Contract: 4 years, $70 million
Why it makes sense: The Hawks' version of Harrison Barnes, Bazemore has showed flashes of brilliance, but it's tough to imagine him ever developing into a true star. Still, $17.5 million per year is the new going rate for 27-year-olds who can defend at a high level and spread the floor.

Bradley Beal
Old team: Wizards
New team: Wizards
Contract: 5 years, $130 million
Why it makes sense: Given Beal's injury history, this is a risky deal for Washington, but it wasn't left with much choice. If the Wizards didn't max him out, someone else was going to. And letting Beal walk would have risked upsetting franchise cornerstone John Wall, while almost guaranteeing a second straight trip to the lottery. When healthy, Beal is an All-Star-caliber shooting guard, but if his history of stress-related injuries persists, the Wizards could regret the long-term commitment to a player who might be on a minutes restriction for the rest of his career.

Anthony Bennett
Old team: Raptors
New team: Nets
Contract: 2 years, minimum
Why it makes sense: The former No. 1 overall pick will join his fourth team in four seasons as he looks to reinvigorate his wildly disappointing career. It's a low-risk move for the Nets, who are simply in a multi-year holding pattern.

Bismack Biyombo
Old team: Raptors
New team: Magic
Contract: 4 years, $70 million
Why it makes sense: The Magic traded for Serge Ibaka on Draft night. They also still have Nik Vucevic. So the addition of Biyombo is a bit of a head-scratcher, but if nothing else he provides insurance if Ibaka leaves next season as an unrestricted free agent. Still, after a rapid ascent during the Eastern Conference Finals, the expectation is that Biyombo will be more than a run-of-the-mill rotational big man. The question is whether he'll be able to unseat Vucevic – a much better scorer but much worse defender – in the starting lineup next to Ibaka.

Tarik Black
Old team: Lakers
New team: Lakers
Contract: 2 years, $13 million
Why it makes sense: The Lakers just spent $64 million on Timofey Mozgov, so signing a cheap backup needed to be a priority.

Trevor Booker
Old team: Jazz
New team: Nets
Contract: 2 years, $18 million
Why it makes sense: The Nets could have paid Thaddeus Young $25 million over the next two years, but instead they'll pay $18 million to Booker. While Booker is an inferior player to Young, the Nets weren't going to challenge for a playoff berth anyway, so he'll essentially serve as a placeholder until Brooklyn has the assets, in the form of draft picks, to truly rebuild in a few years. As things currently stand, Booker projects as the Nets' best option at power forward, despite starting just seven games for Utah over the last two years.

Ian Clark
Old team: Warriors
New team: Warriors
Contract: 1 year, minimum
Why it makes sense: Clark emerged as a serviceable third point guard last season, and he'll return in what should be a larger role off of a depleted Warriors bench.

Jordan Clarkson
Old team: Lakers
New team: Lakers
Contract: 4 years, $50 million
Why it makes sense: This is an ideal scenario for the Lakers, who get Clarkson at well below market value due to the rarely invoked "Arenas Provision." When compared to the money players like Evan Fournier, Kent Bazemore and Chandler Parsons received, Clarkson will be a big-time bargain until he hits the market again at age 28.

Mike Conley
Old team: Grizzlies
New team: Grizzlies
Contract: 5 years, $153 million
Why it makes sense: The Grizzlies have established a brand of loyalty to players, and they made it clear from the outset that retaining Conley was their top priority. The deal means Conley, who's never been to an All-Star Game, is now the NBA's highest-paid player, but the 28-year-old has been an invaluable asset for a franchise that's been to the playoffs each of the last six seasons – a number only San Antonio (19 straight) has matched in the West.

Allen Crabbe
Old team: Trail Blazers
New team: Trail Blazers
Contract: 4 years, $75 million
Why it makes sense: The Blazers probably overpaid for a relatively unproven player, but the 24-year-old Crabbe fits the 3-and-D mold to a tee and will only improve over the course of the contract.

Jamal Crawford
Old team: Clippers
New team: Clippers
Contract: 3 years, $42 million
Why it makes sense: Giving a three-year deal to a 36-year-old is generally a bad idea, but the reigning Sixth Man of the Year has shown few, if any, signs of slowing down as he moves toward the twilight of his career. Crawford remains a dangerous volume scorer and is a locker room favorite in LA, something the Clips clearly took into consideration.

Seth Curry
Old team: Kings
New team: Mavericks
Contract: 2 years, $6 million
Why it makes sense: A strong finish to the season in Sacramento cemented the former D-Leaguer as a legitimate NBA player. We'll see how much of a chance he'll be given in Dallas, but he's a low-risk add at only $3 million per season.

Dewayne Dedmon
Old team: Warriors
New team: Spurs
Contract: 2 years, $6 million
Why it makes sense: The Spurs added Pau Gasol but still needed to add depth to a frontcourt that loses David West, Boris Diaw, Boban Marjanovic, and (probably) Tim Duncan. Dedmon is solid, low-cost option, and he fared well defensively as the fill-in for injured Nik Vucevic late last season.

Matthew Dellavedova
Old team: Cavaliers
New team: Bucks
Contract: 4 years, $38 million
Why it makes sense: The Bucks apparently weren't scared off by Dellavedova losing his job to Mo Williams in the Finals. The scrappy guard is an inefficient scorer at the rim, but he's a capable outside shooter (40.1% 3Pt last season) who can defend both backcourt spots. He'll help to compensate for the departures of O.J. Mayo and Jerryd Bayless.

Luol Deng
Old team: Heat
New team: Lakers
Contract: 4 years, $72 million
Why it makes sense: The Lakers are flush with young talent, and they'll bring in Deng as the veteran to help hold it together. The 31-year-old averaged 12.3 points and 6.0 rebounds for Miami last season, shifting to power forward down the stretch after the loss of Chris Bosh. He'll return to his natural fit on the wing for the Lakers, with the expectation that he'll defend at a high level and aid in the maturation of Brandon Ingram, D'Angelo Russell and Julius Randle.

DeMar DeRozan
Old team: Raptors
New team: Raptors
Contract: 5 years, $139 million
Why it makes sense: Bringing back DeRozan keeps Toronto's All-Star backcourt intact and solidifies the Raptors as a playoff team in the East for at least another couple of years. Do they have enough to truly put a scare into Cleveland? Probably not, but losing DeRozan would have been a crushing blow for a team in the midst of the best run of success in franchise history.

Andre Drummond
Old team: Pistons
New team: Pistons
Contract: 5 years, $130 million ish
Why it makes sense: Drummond was never going anywhere, and he'll cash in on what's a no-brainer max extension for both sides. Even if his offensive game isn't as polished as it could be, Drummond is the best rebounder on the planet, and he's only 22.

Jared Dudley
Old team: Wizards
New team: Suns
Contract: 3 years, $30 million
Why it makes sense: It'd be difficult to make a case against any team bringing in Dudley. He's the quintessential 3-and-D wing coming off of his most efficient shooting season in five years. The soon-to-be-31-year-old has dealt with some injuries, but he's played at least 72 games in each of the last six non-lockout seasons.

Kevin Durant
Old team: Thunder
New team: Warriors
Contract: 2 years, $54 million
Why it makes sense: Not much to say here. When you have the chance to add a top-5 player in the world, you do it. Even if it means you have to part with Harrison Barnes.

James Ennis
Old team: Grizzlies
New team: Grizzlies
Contract: 2 years, $6 million
Why it makes sense: Injuries limited Ennis to just 10 games with the Grizzlies last season after coming over from Miami. The 2013 second-rounder won't be more than a deep bench option, but his athleticism remains intriguing.

Festus Ezeli
Old team: Warriors
New team: Trail Blazers
Contract: 2 years, $14.7 million
Why it makes sense: Portland gets a young, athletic rim-protector on maybe the most team-friendly deal of the offseason. Ezeli was maligned for his play in the Finals, but the Blazers got him for less than half of what the Lakers will pay Timofey Mozgov annually.

Evan Fournier
Old team: Magic
New team: Magic
Contract: 5 years, $85 million
Why it makes sense: The Magic essentially chose Fournier over Victor Oladipo, and they'll get him on what's a reasonably team-friendly deal. Fournier is only 23 and is coming off of a career season in which he averaged 15.4 points and 2.7 assists while shooting 40% from three and nearly 47% from the field.

Tim Frazier
Old team: Pelicans
New team: Pelicans
Contract: 2 years, $4.1 million
Why it makes sense: Frazier initially came to New Orleans on a 10-day deal in March and finished the season with averages of 13.1 points, 4.4 rebounds and 7.5 assists in 16 games. Assuming the Pelicans' aren't again plagued by injuries, he'll settle into a lesser role, but the former Penn State standout has the makings of a reliable second point guard.

Randy Foye
Old team: Thunder
New team: Nets
Contract: 1 year, undisclosed
Why it makes sense: After striking out on a pair of coveted restricted free agents – Allen Crabbe and Tyler Johnson – the Nets are essentially forced to fill out their roster with veteran retreads. While Foye is a fine player, he'll be far from a difference-maker for what could be the league's worst team next season.

Langston Galloway
Old team: Knicks
New team: Pelicans
Contract: 2 years, $10 million
Why it makes sense: Galloway became expendable after New York traded for Derrick Rose and signed Brandon Jennings to a one-year deal. The former undrafted free agent, a Louisiana native, will compete with E'Twaun Moore for minutes behind Jrue Holiday, Tyreke Evans and Buddy Hield.

Pau Gasol
Old team: Bulls
New team: Spurs
Contract: 2 years, $30+ million
Why it makes sense: The Clippers will be back at full strength, but San Antonio still stands as the No. 1 threat to the revamped Warriors out West. It's difficult to discern how, exactly, the addition of Gasol helps the Spurs against Golden State, but he should flourish under Gregg Popovich against most other… let's go with "traditional" opponents.

Eric Gordon
Old team: Pelicans
New team: Rockets
Contract: 4 years, $33 million
Why it makes sense: Gordon hasn't played more than 64 games since his rookie season and he's approaching 28 years old, but this is still an excellent value deal for Houston. Gordon has been somewhat erratic as a shooter but if he's able to stay even remotely healthy, the Rockets will have stolen a career 38.3% three-point shooter for just over $8 million per year. In this cap environment, that's a bargain.

Jeff Green
Old team: Clippers
New team: Magic
Contract: 1 year, $15 million
Why it makes sense: The Magic have done an incredible job in the last two weeks of disguising exactly what their long-term plan is, but it's clear the goal is to make the playoffs next season. After trading for Serge Ibaka and signing Bismack Biyombo, they took a flyer on Green, who will jump to his fourth team in three years. Ibaka's presence likely means Aaron Gordon will start at small forward, so Green may be looking at a bench role after starting 41 of 80 games for the Grizzlies and Clippers last season.

Justin Hamilton
Old team: Overseas (Spain)
New team: Nets
Contract: 2 years, $6 million
Why it makes sense: Hamilton was a marginally effective player for the Heat in 2014-15, and he'll bring cost-effective depth to a Nets team simply trying to avoid sending another high-lottery pick to Boston.

Joe Harris
Old team: Cavaliers
New team: Nets
Contract: $2 years, $2 million
Why it makes sense: Harris has ties to the Nets organization through his time in the D-League, but he'll likely be a deep bench player, and his is reportedly non-guaranteed.

Gerald Henderson
Old team: Trail Blazers
New team: 76ers
Contract: 2 years, $18 million
Why it makes sense: The Sixers have officially begun their transition back to fielding a real NBA team. Both Henderson and Jerryd Bayless will bring strong veteran leadership to what's otherwise still very much a rag-tag Philly backcourt. Henderson is what he is as this point, but he's steadily improved as a three-point shooter each year and shot a career-best 35.3% from deep last season.

Roy Hibbert
Old team: Lakers
New team: Hornets
Contract: 1 year, $5 million
Why it makes sense: Hibbert's effectiveness has fallen off considerably since his last All-Star season in 2013-14, but he's still only 29 and worth a flyer for just $5 million.

Nene Hilario
Old team: Wizards
New team: Rockets
Contract: 1 year, $2.9 million
Why it makes sense: On paper, Nene doesn't look like a good fit in a Mike D'Antoni offense, but he's about as capable a talent as the Rockets were going to find at this price. The veteran brings a true interior threat to a roster in need of bodies up front following the departure of Dwight Howard.

Jordan Hill
Old team: Pacers
New team: Timberwolves
Contract: 2 years, $8 million
Why it makes sense: The 29-year-old has settled in as a permanent NBA role player, but getting him at just $4 million per year is a steal for a Wolves team desperate for frontcourt depth.

Solomon Hill
Old team: Pacers
New team: Pelicans
Contract: 4 years, $48 million
Why it makes sense: Hill was underutilized in three years with the Pacers, and he's still somewhat of an unknown commodity. The Pelicans are betting that his per-minute production – 10.2 points, 6.9 rebounds, 2.4 assists per-36 last season – translates smoothly to what should be an increased role on the wing.

Al Horford
Old team: Hawks
New team: Celtics
Contract: 4 years, $113 million
Why it makes sense: Horford is a four-time All-Star and an instant upgrade wherever Boston decides to play him. His addition, alone, won't vault Boston into legitimate title contention, but it's no secret the Celtics will attempt to parlay their treasure trove of assets into another star or two at some point.

Dwight Howard
Old team: Rockets
New team: Hawks
Contract: 3 years, $70.5 million
Why it makes sense: Howard's exit from Houston wasn't a smooth one, but he'll head to his hometown for a much-needed fresh start. The signing essentially sealed the deal on Al Horford leaving, but that might not have been the worst outcome for a franchise in desperate need of a shake-up. Keeping the status quo and bringing back Horford would have meant another playoff run, but after a second straight sweep at the hands of the Cavs, it was clear the Hawks didn't have a championship-caliber roster. Swapping Horford for Howard doesn't change that, but Howard is about as capable a replacement as Atlanta could have hoped for, even if he comes with considerable baggage.

Marcelo Huertas
Old team: Lakers
New team: Lakers
Contract: 2 years, undisclosed
Why it makes sense: Huertas was… not great as a 32-year-old rookie last season, but the Lakers will keep him around as the apparent third point guard behind D'Angelo Russell and Jose Calderon.

Al Jefferson
Old team: Hornets
New team: Pacers
Contract: 3 years, $30 million
Why it makes sense: Jefferson battled injuries and was slapped with a drug-related suspension last season, but when healthy he's one of the league's few elite back-down scorers. With the league increasingly moving away from that style, Jefferson's value isn't what it once was, but he's a nice, low-risk addition for a revamped Pacers team that needed to fill the void left by Ian Mahinmi's departure.

Richard Jefferson
Old team: Cavaliers
New team: Cavaliers
Contract: 2 years, $5 million
Why it makes sense: Initially believed to simply be along for the ride, Jefferson ended up as one of the Cavs' most important role players on both ends of the floor in the postseason. LeBron and Co. are thrilled to have him back for at least one more go-round at the veteran's minimum.

Brandon Jennings
Old team: Magic
New team: Knicks
Contract: 1 year, $5 million
Why it makes sense: Jennings to New York has long been rumored, though the way things turned out wasn't how either side imagined. Jennings struggled to establish himself in Orlando last season following a torn Achilles and trade from Detroit. The Knicks are offering a fresh start, but Jennings will have to settle for the backup job behind Derrick Rose.

James Johnson
Old team: Raptors
New team: Heat
Contract: 1 year, $4 million
Why it makes sense: A fan-favorite in Toronto, Johnson's production never quite matched his profile, but his athleticism and versatile defensive ability makes him worth a one-year, low-cost flyer.

Joe Johnson
Old team: Heat
New team: Jazz
Contract: 2 years, $22 million
Why it makes sense: The Jazz saw an opportunity to add a still-effective veteran at a low cost and took it. It's somewhat of a curious move for a team already rostering Alec Burks and Rodney Hood, but Johnson brings loads of playoff experience that virtually no one on Utah's current roster has.

Courtney Lee
Old team: Hornets
New team: Knicks
Contract: 4 years, $48 million
Why it makes sense: After losing Arron Afflalo, the Knicks had money to spend and grabbed a capable replacement in Lee, a 3-and-D shooting guard who complements the shot-heavy stylings of Carmelo Anthony and Derrick Rose. Lee has made at least 37% of his threes in seven of his eight NBA seasons and will help alleviate the Knicks' spacing issues.

Jon Leuer
Old team: Suns
New team: Pistons
Contract: 4 years, $42 million
Why it makes sense: Leuer eclipsed 1,000 minutes for the first time in his career last season, taking on a larger role down the stretch for the injury-riddled Suns. The Wisconsin product has seemingly always been the odd man out of the rotation, but he posted career-bests of 16.3 points and 10.7 rebounds per-36 minutes last season. As a floor-spacing (38.2% 3Pt last season) four, he's a perfect fit in Stan Van Gundy's system, and he should have the advantage over similarly skilled rookie Henry Ellenson right away.

Jeremy Lin
Old team: Hornets
New team: Nets
Contract: 3 years, $36 million
Why it makes sense: Lin outperformed his contract in Charlotte last season and was due for a sizable raise, in addition to a chance to start full-time. He'll get both in Brooklyn on what's a strong deal for both sides.

Ian Mahinmi
Old team: Pacers
New team: Wizards
Contract: 4 years, $64 million
Why it makes sense: Mahinmi only makes the Wizards marginally better, but he's still an upgrade, especially defensively, over the aging Nene. If Bradley Beal stays healthy, Washington should have enough to return to the playoffs next season.

Boban Marjanovic
Old team: Spurs
New team: Pistons
Contract: 3 years, $21 million
Why it makes sense: Marjanovic turned into somewhat of a sideshow last season, masking what was a very productive, per-minute, rookie year. He doesn't have an obvious fit in Detroit, but he could slide in as the backup center in 2017-18 if/when Aron Baynes opts out of his deal next summer.

Luc Richard Mbah a Moute
Old team: Clippers
New team: Clippers
Contract: 2 years, $4.5 million
Why it makes sense: Mbah a Moute quietly started 61 games last season, earning unanimous First-Team All-Didn't Even Realize He Was in the League honors. The UCLA product is as limited as it gets offensively, but he's among the NBA's most versatile defenders. Bringing him back at this price is a no-brainer.

E'Twaun Moore
Old team: Bulls
New team: Pelicans
Contract: 4 years, $34 million
Why it makes sense: After losing Eric Gordon and (likely) Norris Cole, the Pelicans needed to add depth behind Jrue Holiday, Buddy Hield, and Tyreke Evans. Moore can play both guard spots and shot a career-best 45.2% from three in Chicago last season. New Orleans could have looked for a cheaper option, but this is a franchise that wants to avoid wasting another Anthony Davis season missing the playoffs.

Timofey Mozgov
Old team: Cavaliers
New team: Lakers
Contract: 4 years, $64 million
Why it makes sense: Even with the cap going up, the Lakers might have overpaid here. Mozgov is still relatively young and has a proven track record of being an effective big man, but he's nearly unplayable against smaller lineups. He'll be an upgrade over Roy Hibbert, but it's tough to imagine Mozgov really moving the needle for the Lakers after playing just 76 total minutes during the entire Cavaliers postseason run.

Maurice Ndour
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Knicks
Contract: 2 years, undisclosed
Why it makes sense: The Knicks have had their eye on Ndour since last June, when he impressed as a member of their Las Vegas Summer League entry. Ndour ultimately spent the season in Spain, but he'll now get his first real NBA opportunity. It's unlikely Ndour makes much of an impact this season, but he's a cheap, high-upside prospect.

Andrew Nicholson
Old team: Magic
New team: Wizards
Contract: 4 years, $26 million
Why it makes sense: Perpetually buried on the depth chart in four years with the Magic, Nicholson will finally have a chance to emerge in a consistent bench role for the Wizards. Expectations should still be relatively low, but Nicholson is an efficient scorer who expanded his range and shot a career-best 36% from three last season.

Joakim Noah
Old team: Bulls
New team: Knicks
Contract: 4 years, $72 million
Why it makes sense: While Noah is coming off of by far the worst year of his career, the Knicks are hoping injuries and general unhappiness were mostly to blame. Noah steps into what's suddenly an intriguing situation in his native New York, teaming with Derrick Rose, Kristaps Porzingis and Carmelo Anthony to form what should be a playoff contender in the East. The length of the deal is what's concerning here. Noah's 29-game 2015-16 showing, which ended with shoulder surgery in January, didn't exactly inspire hope of a post-prime revival. Maybe playing alongside Porzingis and Anthony is the jolt Noah needs, but two or three years down the road this has the makings of a commitment the Knicks will regret.

Dirk Nowitzki
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Mavericks
Contract: 2 years, $40 million
Why it makes sense: Nowitzki cashes in after taking a couple massive discounts over the years to accommodate other additions. The deal is believed to include a player option for 2017-18, enabling Nowitzki the opportunity to conveniently ride off into the sunset, should he so choose. Even under the new cap, $20 million is a big number for Nowitzki, but he was still the Mavs' best player last year, putting up numbers at age 37 that were on par with each of his previous three seasons.

Zaza Pachulia
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Warriors
Contract: 1 year, $2.9 million
Why it makes sense: Pachulia is an underrated center whose creativeness around the rim should fit well in Golden State. Getting him on a minimum deal is an absolute steal – there's a reason executives around the league were upset with how it went down.

Chandler Parsons
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Grizzlies
Contract: 4 years, $95 million
Why it makes sense: Much like the Wizards with Beal, the Grizzlies are taking a major gamble that Parson's knees will hold up. Microfracture surgery is about as serious as it gets, but if Parsons can regain his borderline-All-Star form, he'll be a perfect third option next to Mike Conley and Marc Gasol.

Dwight Powell
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Mavericks
Contract: 4 years, $37 million
Why it makes sense: Once a throw-in in the Jae Crowder deal, Powell has developed into a rotational big man for Rick Carlisle. He's still unpolished in some areas but should be set for a larger role whenever Dirk Nowitzki decides to call it quits.

Austin Rivers
Old team: Clippers
New team: Clippers
Contract: 3 years, $35 million
Why it makes sense: After a couple of forgettable seasons in New Orleans, Rivers has developed into a very serviceable backup guard in LA. He continues to improve as a shooter, and his ability to defend both guard spots will only be more valuable as Chris Paul, J.J. Redick and Jamal Crawford age.

Brian Roberts
Old team: Trail Blazers
New team: Hornets
Contract: 1 year, minimum
Why it makes sense: Roberts isn't going to provide anything spectacular, but he's an experienced, rock-solid third point guard.

Sergio Rodriguez
Old team: Overseas (Spain)
New team: 76ers
Contract: 1 year, $8 million
Why it makes sense: Despite being loaded up front, the Sixers entered the offseason with a D-League-level backcourt. Rodriguez is experienced in the NBA and overseas and will team with Jerryd Bayless – and Ben Simmons, at times – to form a respectable point guard rotation.

Rajon Rondo
Old team: Kings
New team: Bulls
Contract: 2 years, $28 million
Why it makes sense: Well, it doesn't, really. The Bulls essentially replaced one enigmatic point guard with another, but it was somewhat of a predictable move for a franchise firmly entrenched against the idea of rebuilding. How Rondo's game meshes with that of backcourt mate Jimmy Butler will ultimately determine whether the signing works out. Rondo's last two stints in Sacramento and Dallas haven't exactly been encouraging.

Brandon Rush
Old team: Warriors
New team: Timberwolves
Contract: 1 year, $3.5 million
Why it makes sense: Rush has never quite regained his pre-injury form, but he's a nice backcourt addition for a Wolves team in dire need of bench upgrades. The former Kansas star shot 41.4% from three last season.

Luis Scola
Old team: Raptors
New team: Nets
Contract: 1 year, undisclosed
Why it makes sense: Scola's effectiveness has waned considerably in recent years, but he remains a passable rotation player. This is not going to be a strong Nets team.

Ish Smith
Old team: 76ers
New team: Pistons
Contract: 3 years, $18 million
Why it makes sense: Smith emerged as one of the few bright spots for the Sixers last season, and Detroit got excellent value for a player who will be a massive upgrade over Steve Blake and Spencer Dinwiddie.

Jason Smith
Old team: Magic
New team: Wizards
Contract: 3 years, $16 million
Why it makes sense: After missing out on Ryan Anderson, the Wizards signed Smith, Andrew Nicholson and Ian Mahinmi – a formidable, if not redundant, trio. Washington certainly didn't overpay, though, so it's hard to blame the Wizards for snapping up capable veteran talent at any position.

Marreese Speights
Old team: Warriors
New team: Clippers
Contract: 1 year, minimum
Why it makes sense: Golden State was the perfect situation for Speights to embrace his full Speights-ness, but he should see more opportunity with the Clippers. His ability to stretch the floor will give Doc Rivers the option to have five capable shooters on the floor at once when DeAndre Jordan rests.

Mirza Teletovic
Old team: Suns
New team: Bucks
Contract: 3 years, $30 million
Why it makes sense: The Bucks were the worst three-point shooting team in the league last season, and Teletovic was one of the better marksmen available. He won't help Milwaukee's defensive issues, but he'll fit well next to – or behind – Jabari Parker, who hit just nine threes last season.

Garrett Temple
Old team: Wizards
New team: Kings
Contract: 3 years, $24 million
Why it makes sense: Temple won't move the needle much, but he provides coach Dave Joerger with a competent two-way guard who can play both backcourt spots.

Lance Thomas
Old team: Knicks
New team: Knicks
Contract: 4 years, $27 million
Why it makes sense:
After paying up to add Derrick Rose and Joakim Noah, the Knicks secured Thomas on a team-friendly deal that'll pay him an annual average of just under $7 million. Thomas made only seven threes in 2014-15 but knocked down 44 last season, emerging as a dependable, two-way energy forward off the bench. If he proves last year's shooting numbers weren't an anomaly, he'll again be a solid, versatile option behind Carmelo Anthony.

Evan Turner
Old team: Celtics
New team: Trail Blazers
Contract: 4 years, $75 million
Why it makes sense: Even with the cap jump, $75 million is a striking figure for Turner. The Blazers may have slightly overpaid, but they'll get a versatile player who can defend three spots and handle the ball if Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum are off the floor. With Gerald Henderson already gone, Turner will help soften the blow if the Blazers lose restricted free agent Allen Crabbe, as well.

Greivis Vasquez
Old team: Bucks
New team: Nets
Contract: 1 year, $5 million
Why it makes sense: The Nets are gambling that Vasquez will return to form after what was essentially a lost 2015-16 season. At just $5 million, he's a low-cost addition.

Sasha Vujacic
Old team: Knicks
New team: Knicks
Contract: 1 year, $1.4 million
Why it makes sense: Vujacic shouldn't see much of the floor after shooting just 38% last season, but he's a familiar face and knows the triangle offense.

Dwyane Wade
Old team: Heat
New team: Bulls
Contract: 2 years, $47.5 million
Why it makes sense: Aside from the fact that Wade is a Chicago native, this makes little sense for either side, on paper. Wade got his money, but at this point in his career it's fair to question whether the addition even makes Chicago a playoff team. It'll keep the Bulls relevant, but a Rondo-Wade-Butler trio will be a spacing nightmare, and it's no guarantee those three personalities will mesh off the court, either. On the bright side, Wade will have a player option next summer, so if this Chicago experiement is a disaster, he'll have a way out.

David West
Old team: Spurs
New team: Warriors
Contract: 1 year, $1.6 million
Why it makes sense: For the second straight year, West will take the veteran's minimum in search of a ring. And it's tough to blame him. GM Bob Myers and the Warriors will welcome West with open arms as they fill out what's already shaping up to be a very respectable, veteran bench unit.

Hassan Whiteside
Old team: Heat
New team: Heat
Contract: 4 years, $98 million
Why it makes sense: Even if Dwyane Wade re-signs, the Heat probably aren't going to be title contenders next season. However, Pat Riley will make serious runs at top-tier talent again next summer when the likes of Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul, Serge Ibaka, and Blake Griffin hit the market. With the 27-year-old Whiteside's future now solidified, Miami's pitch to free agents is even stronger.

Deron Williams
Old team: Mavericks
New team: Mavericks
Contract: 1 year, $10 million
Why it makes sense: Williams' rapid, injury-riddled descent from the upper echelon of NBA point guards has sullied his reputation, but he was quietly decent last season, despite a down year shooting the ball. Williams just turned 32, and if he can shoot the three at closer to a 37 or 38% clip, the Mavs will have made the right move bringing him back on a one-year deal.

Marvin Williams
Old team: Hornets
New team: Hornets
Contract: 4 years, $55 million
Why it makes sense: Coming off of a 48-win season – the franchise's highest total since 1999-00 – Charlotte wants to avoid another setback similar to the 10-win dip that immediately preceded its last playoff berth in 2014. Re-signing Williams, as well as fellow versatile wing Nic Batum, should help keep Charlotte in the playoff mix, but losing Al Jefferson, Courtney Lee and Jeremy Lin will hurt. Williams is coming off of arguably the best statistical year of his career, though at age 30 he's unlikely to get much better over the length of the contract.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Nick Whalen
RotoWire's NBA Editor and host of the RotoWire NBA Podcast. Nick was awarded the FSWA Best Podcast -- All Sports award in 2017 and 2018. Many years ago, Stromile Swift gave Nick his unbelievably sweaty headband after a preseason game. Despite its failure to match his school colors, Nick went on to wear that headband for the entirety of his sixth grade basketball season. Catch Nick on Twitter @wha1en.
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